Link: Holy Trinity Orthodox Church in Rock Springs, Wyoming, USA

http://usaofmyheart.wordpress.com

USA OF MY HEART

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Rock Springs, Wyoming, USA

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http://holytrinityrs.org

Holy Trinity Orthodox Church

in Rock Springs, Wyoming, USA

Holy Trinity Greek Orthodox
405 N St, Rock Springs, WY 82901, USA

Click here

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A Native American Prayer – We will fly on wings like eagles

http://alaskaofmyheart.wordpress.com

https://nativeamericansmetorthodoxy.wordpress.com

NATIVE AMERICANS MET ORTHODOXY

ALASKA OF MY HEART

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A Native American Prayer

We will fly on wings like eagles

╰⊰¸¸.•¨*

Dear God

I bow my head

and ask,

If it be Thy will,

please save this land

from those who seek

to destroy it.

-Amen-

Source:

https://www.facebook.com/Native-American-Orthodox-Christian-Fellowship-NAOCF-160917590660985/HERE

FACEBOOK: NATIVE AMERICAN ORTHODOX CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP (NAOCF)

So we are truly on a wing and prayer. What an incredible symbol. When I was in Alaska as part of Alaska Team 2001 sent by the Orthodox Christian Missionary Center (http://www.ocmc.org) I saw a bald eagle, everyday, and if I saw one, I ALWAYS saw three minimum.

I’ve always loved our national symbol and spending the time that I did in Alaska gave me such a feeling of peace and love for this land in which I was born and for it’s Native Peoples that I can’t even express. Seeing Eagles everyday gave me a feeling like I was sharing my experience with them.

I am aware that such atrocities were committed against the Indigenous Populations here in both North & South America (let’s not forget the Hawaiians and other Pacific Islanders as well), by Western Europeans in the name of God and of “Progress”. While Alaskans were not totally exempt from all that, it should be noted that the Orthodox Church in Alaska more often helped and protected the Alaskans (where & when they could).

Anyone who is interested can check out our website at: http://www.NAOCF.org for more information and through that site you can reach out to our Spiritual Adviser Fr. Thomas Andrew who is a Native Yupik Priest. Also, I’ll refer you to a PDF of our Journal (also available on our website) in particular an article written by Fr. Michael Oleksa, another Native Priest living and serving in Alaska. They are just two of the Native clergy serving Our Lord and their People in the North.

 

After 87 years at the Smithsonian, bones of Alaska Natives returned and reburied

http://orthodox-heart-sites.blogspot.com

ORTHODOX HEART SITES

After 87 years at the Smithsonian,

bones of Alaska Natives returned and reburied

Source:

http://orthochristian.com

http://orthochristian.com/107449.html

ORTHODOX CHRISTIANITY

Anthropologists once excavated the graves of thousands of Native Americans. Now museums in the U.S. are slowly working to return those remains and funerary objects to tribes.

A village in southwest Alaska recently reburied 24 of their ancestors who had been excavated by a Smithsonian anthropologist in 1931.

About half of the village of Igiugig crowded into the Russian Orthodox Church in the center of town on a drizzly fall day. In the center of the nave sat three handmade, wooden coffins that held the bones from the now-abandoned settlement of Kaskanak.

The remains were unearthed by Aleš Hrdlička, who was the head of the anthropology department in what is now the Smithsonian’s National Museum of Natural History. The question of how people originally came to North America and from where drove Hrdlička to dig up the bones of Native Americans all around the United States. Historians estimate that he took thousands to Washington, D.C., for research.

After more than eight decades in the museum’s collection, Igiugig’s ancestors finally returned home for reburial.

Avery Lill
10/22/2017

Saint Matushka Olga Michael of Alaska (+1979)

http://alaskaofmyheart.wordpress.com

ALASKA OF MY HEART

Saint Matushka Olga Michael of Alaska (+1979)

Source:

http://orthodoxcanada.ca

http://orthodoxcanada.ca/Saint_Matushka_Olga_Michael_of_Alaska

ORTHODOX CANADA

Archpriest Nicolai O Michael (1912-1984) and Saint Matushka Olga Michael of Alaska (1916-1979)

Notes about the lives of the Archpriest Nicolai O Michael and his wife, Matushka Olga (Arrsamquq) Michael, are presented in the context of Canadian Orthodox biographies, even though neither of them had any direct personal contact with Canada. Nevertheless, details of their lives parallel those of many of the Orthodox Canadian clergy of the earlier part of the 20th century. More importantly, the presenting of their lives can help us to understand how the Lord works in different ways with two Christ-loving and Christ-serving people, in order to help, encourage and console others. In this case, the Lord seems to have extended Matushka Olga’s loving service and care for others far beyond her own village, in ways which convince many people that she is truly holy, truly a saint. The “Canadian connexion” in this regard concerns the many Canadians who are certain that “Mother Olga” is praying for them, and that as a result, help and healing have come from the Lord.

Nicolai O Michael

Nicolai O Michael was born in the village of Kwethluk in Alaska, USA, on 24 August, 1912. The available details of his life were written by his grand-daughter, Olga (Michael) McGill. Kwethluk is located at the confluence of the Kuskokwim and Kwethluk rivers in the Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta. The constantly changing channel of the river gives the village its name. “Kwethluk” is derived from the Yup’ik words “kuik”, meaning “river”, and “-rrluk”, meaning “bad, unnatural”. “Nicolai”, writes his grand-daughter, “was a very caring person, and well known throughout the delta. He loved to fish and hunt. He also herded reindeer, which were used both as pack animals and as food for the community”.

Marriage ; seminary ; parish service

Nicolai married his wife, Olga (Arrsamquq), who was often called “Olinka”, an affectionate Russian form of her name. This marriage was an arranged marriage ; and at the beginning, communication between the two was difficult. Nicolai was not yet a particularly “churchly” man. Together, they received from the Lord 13 children, of whom only 8 survived to adulthood. His grand-daughter wrote that he was a strict father. Earlier in his life, Nicolai started the first US Post Office and General Store in Kwethluk, where he was the manager. All along, Olga was praying for her husband. After a time, he began to attend church, and he and 6 other village men became church readers. They then attended Saint Herman’s Seminary in Kodiak, and all but one were then ordained to the Holy Priesthood. Very many of the former Russian and American clergy had by this time left their parishes, and the parish-circuits remained vacant for a long time. It is useful to understand that it was the pressing and particular local need that caused the establishment of Saint Herman’s Seminary in 1972. This process of depletion had begun with the sale of Alaska to the USA, and it was increased by pressures from the strongly-Protestant-minded government which followed. It was just after the transfer of Bishop Theodosius (Lazor) from the diocese that the Archpriest Joseph Kreta made the proposal to establish the seminary, and that this proposal was blessed by the Holy Synod of Bishops of The Orthodox Church in America.
Father Nicolai was the very first priest in the village of Kwethluk, and when he returned to serve Kwethluk, he became greatly beloved by the people. It is important to understand that before she became a matushka, Olga was continuously praying for a long time for her husband and for her village. During her lifetime, 85 percent of the students (7 of 8) who went to Saint Herman’s Seminary came from Blessed Olga’s tiny village, Kwethluk, which had a Continue reading “Saint Matushka Olga Michael of Alaska (+1979)”

Η εύρεση του Θησαυρού – Όταν οι Αυτόχθονοι Αμερικανοί συναντούν την Ορθοδοξία

http://orthodox-heart-sites.blogspot.com

ORTHODOX HEART SITES

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Η εύρεση του Θησαυρού

╰⊰¸¸.•¨*

Όταν οι Αυτόχθονες Αμερικανοί συναντούν την Ορθοδοξία

Πηγή:

https://www.facebook.com/Native-American-Orthodox-Christian-Fellowship-NAOCF-160917590660985/

FACEBOOK: NATIVE AMERICAN ORTHODOX CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP (NAOCF)

 

Video: ᐊᓛᓯᑲ Alaska – Orthodoxy ╰⊰¸¸.•¨* ᐃᓄᒃᑎᑐᑦ Inuktitut Native American (Canada & Alaska)

http://alaskaofmyheart.wordpress.com

https://nativeamericansmetorthodoxy.wordpress.com

http://canadaofmyheart.wordpress.com

ALASKA OF MY HEART

NATIVE AMERICANS MET ORTHODOXY

CANADA OF MY HEART

ᐊᓛᓯᑲ Alaska – Orthodoxy

ᐃᓄᒃᑎᑐᑦ Inuktitut Native American (Canada & Alaska)

Robert Arakaki, Hawaii, USA: From Unchurched Hawaiian to Local Orthodox

http://usaofmyheart.wordpress.com

http://nativeamericansofmyheart.wordpress.com

http://hawaiiofmyheart.wordpress.com

USA OF MY HEART

NATIVE AMERICANS OF MY HEART

HAWAII OF MY HEART

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Robert Arakaki, Hawaii, USA:

From Unchurched Hawaiian to Local Orthodox

http://journeytoorthodoxy.comHERE

JOURNEY TO ORTHODOXY

I grew up unchurched. I became a Christian in high school through reading the Living Bible. I was active in InterVarsity Christian Fellowship at the University of Hawaii. My home church was Kalihi Union Church (KUC), a fine evangelical congregation that was part of the United Church of Christ (UCC).

I was deeply troubled by the UCC’s liberal theology and wanted to help it return to its biblical roots. This led me to study at Gordon-Conwell Theological Seminary for the purpose of preparing to become an evangelical seminary professor in the liberal United Church of Christ to help the UCC return to its biblical roots.

However, in a surprising turn of events, I became Orthodox!

It was my first week at seminary. As I walked down the hallway of Main Dorm I saw on the door of one of the student’s room an icon of Christ. I thought to myself,

“An icon in a Calvinist seminary!?!”

This was to be the first of many encounters with Eastern Orthodoxy.

After receiving my M.A. in Church History, I did doctoral studies at the Graduate Theological Union in Berkeley, California. While there I attended Saints Kyril and Methodios Bulgarian Orthodox Church. I was drawn to the deep mystical worship of liturgical worship that was rooted in the historic Christian Faith. I also felt comfortable with its all-English services and a congregation that was made up mostly of converts. Orthodox worship presents a stark contrast to the emotionally driven entertainment that passes for contemporary Evangelical worship.

My journey to Orthodoxy began when little questions about Protestant theology turned into big questions, and the big questions turned into a theological crisis. Protestant theology holds up so long as one accepts certain premises but becomes problematic when considered from the standpoint of church history and the early Church Fathers. As a church history major I became painfully aware that much of what passes for Evangelicalism: the altar call, the symbolic understanding of the Lord’s Supper, the inductive bible study method, minimalist creed, the rapture, all have their origins in the 1800s.

This means that Evangelicalism is a modern innovation as is Liberalism.

But more troubling was my investigation of classical Reformation theology, e.g., Martin Luther and John Calvin. Two foundational tenets of Protestantism: sola fide (faith alone) and sola scriptura (Bible alone), were not part of the early Church and rely upon reading the Bible in a certain way. Moreover, these two tenets originated out of the theological debates of Medieval Scholasticism. In other words, the Protestant Reformation marks not a return to the historic Christian Faith, but rather a late innovation.

What makes Orthodoxy so daunting to an Evangelical is its understanding that to have the true Faith means belonging to the one, holy catholic and apostolic Church. If the Orthodox Church is the true Church, then that meant that I needed to resign my membership from Kalihi Union Church and become Orthodox. I was received into the Orthodox Church on the Sunday of Orthodoxy in 1999 at Sts. Constantine and Helen Greek Orthodox Church in Honolulu. I am very grateful for what I have learned from Evangelicalism but there is so much more to Christianity. Orthodoxy is the fulfillment of Evangelical theology and worship.

Robert Arakaki, Hawaii, USA